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Aarti Shahani

Aarti Shahani is a Tech Reporter on NPR's Business Desk, where she covers breaking news, and does investigative and enterprise reporting.

Since joining NPR's tech beat in May 2014, Shahani has reported from five countries and covered the world's biggest tech events, including the International Consumer Electronics Show.

In her first year, Shahani has shed light on hidden stories, such as the role of cyberstalking in domestic abuse, and the underground world of hackers. Shahani's reports have taken her to unlikely places – including a secretive Hollywood film set using drone cameras.

Before coming to NPR as a Kroc Fellow in 2011-2012, Shahani started a non-profit in her native New York City to help immigrant families facing deportation after September 11th. She notes she first met NPR as a source, pitching NPR a story about a detainee who'd died because of deliberate medical neglect. Of her unusual path to journalism, she notes, "Basically, I spent my 20s with prisoners. I'm spending my 30s with billionaires in Silicon Valley. And I've learned: People are just people."

Her reporting has been honored with a regional award from the Society of Professional Journalists for "Finding Hidden Genius"; a regional Edward R. Murrow Award for "On Immigration, High Tech and Ag Don't Meet, Literally"; and an Investigative Reporters & Editors Award for "Post Mortem: Death Investigation in America" with ProPublica, NPR, and Frontline.

Shahani received a Master in Public Policy degree from Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, with generous support from the University and the Paul & Daisy Soros fellowship. She has a bachelor's degree from the University of Chicago.

Microsoft has had a whirlwind last few days. The company's Windows operating system was the target of a massive cyberattack that took down hundreds of thousands of computers across 150 countries. While it's too soon to say the worst is over — there could be another wave — the president of the company does have two big takeaways.

One takeaway is sexy and edgy. The other is boring, plain vanilla — but no less important to Brad Smith, president of Microsoft.

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Uber is in crisis. This week the president resigned, after just six months on the job. Morale has been shaken following a damning account of sexual harassment. The board of directors is so concerned about the CEO's ability to lead, they're looking for a No. 2 to help steer the company.

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